THE 39 STEPS at Amsterdam’s CC Amstel Theater

The 39 Steps is more like an enhanced radio play. The difference is that a vast amount of imagination has already gone into it, so much so that it is easy to envisage the dashing hero leaping along the lofty girders of the Forth Bridge or running across the moors with the wind blowing through his hair. It’s like a radio play that provides you with a visual aids kit

THE TOOROP DYNASTY at the Stedelijk Museum, Alkmaar

Jan Toorop’s paintings are exhibited next to works by his talented daughter Charlie Toorop (1891-1955) and works of her son, artist Edgar Fernhout (1912-1974). Curator Marjan van Heteren uses Charlie as a link between Jan Toorop and Edgar Fernhout

RONLEY TEPER AND THE LIPLINERS at De Stamboom in The Hague

The audience at The Hague’s cosy De Stamboom bar last night were not sure what they had come to see, nobody ever is. Ms Teper draws a fine line between being singer and performance artist. No two songs are alike, some are lyrical, almost poppy, others are aggressive growls performed in a Tom Waits type voice.

FRANKIE’S CHOICE plus two more Rotterdam exhibitions

Frank Taal has an eclectic mix of artists in his stable, utilising a wide range of techniques of which painting is rather in the minority. I have seen several shows at the Van Speykstraat space but seeing all the gallery artists together offered a new and informative perspective . . .

Soir Historique by NDT1 in The Hague and then on tour

We normally expect to see dance performed in wide open spaces with uncluttered stages and any décor set on the perimeter to allow the dancers lots of room to move. So, for a piece of choreography to be presented in a confined and defined area seems counter-intuitive, perverse almost.

Samir Calixto’s SUMMA at the Korzo in The Hague and on tour

First seen in the Holland Dance Festival last year, this reprise of Summa fuses the unique talents of the Amsterdam Cello Octet and Brazilian choreographer Samir Calixto to the sublime music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. The all-white stage, set and costumes were offset by the seductive brown patina of the eight cellos as the musicians sat in an arc . . .