Monumental works by Eva Jospin on view for the first time in The Netherlands

Eva Jospin, Balcon, 2015. Metal and cardboard, 250 x 330 x 35 cm.
Photo: Olivier Toggwiler. Courtesy Eva Jospin and Galerie Suzanne Tarasieve

At the Noordbrabants Museum in ‘s-Hertogenbosch

With Eva Jospin, the museum is once again introducing an internationally rising star in the Netherlands. With space-filling installations made of simple cardboard, Jospin creates forests, temples, ruins and caves. Eva Jospin: Paper Tales takes the visitor through a fairy-tale landscape. The exhibition is on view from 13th March to 19th September.

Eva Jospin gained international fame with her monumental reliefs of forests. The sculptures, made entirely of brown cardboard, are impressive not only because of their monumentality but also because of Jospin’s attention to detail. Cardboard turns into rocks, stones and vegetation under Jospin’s hands. In a meticulous process of cutting, cutting and overlaying, Jospin evokes the magic of illusion and decor with her work.

Working with cardboard

Because the artworks are made of cardboard, they still look fragile despite their size. Cardboard, a biodegradable material, reminds us of transience and the fragility of the ecosystems around us.

Jospin’s work also reveals the intrinsic value of cardboard: a well-known and trusted material without any aesthetic quality but with unimagined possibilities. At the same time, it is also somewhat alienating, because in these works of art cardboard functions as a replacement for an earlier form of itself, namely wood.

About Eva Jospin

Eva Jospin (Paris 1975) is a visual artist with a background in architecture, an interest that is clearly visible in her work. In 2015 she won the Prix de l’Académie des Beaux-Arts. Eva Jospin has realized monumental installations all over France: on the Cour Carrée in the Louvre, the Domaine de Trévarez in Chaumont-sur-Loire, in the Beaupassage in Paris, at the Biennale for Landscape and Architecture in Versailles and on Voyage, an exhibition of public sculpture in Nantes. She has had successful international exhibitions at Museum Pfalzgalerie Kaiserslautern, Grand Palais and the Manufacture des Gobelins both in Paris.

Made possible thanks to

The term “surprising” certainly applies to the exhibitions that Het Noordbrabants Museum organizes annually in collaboration with the Renschdael Art Foundation. These are exhibitions by successful foreign artists to whom a solo exhibition has not previously been dedicated in the Netherlands. Previously, the Chinese Shao Fan (2020), the Iranian-American Ali Banisadr (2019), the Indian Manish Nai (2018), the Japanese Chiharu Shiota (2017) and the Northern Irish Claire Morgan (2016) made their debut at Het Noordbrabants Museum.